L&C Talk: Miroslav Sedivy, The geopolitical background of the debates on international law in the mid-19th century

Dhondt, F. (Chair), Miroslav Sedivy (Participant), De Rycke, W. (Organiser), Volkaert, F. (Participant), Cattelan, S. (Participant), Van Der Smissen, R. (Participant), Swyngedouw, A. (Participant), Senne De Kerpel (Participant), Sebastiaan Vandenbogaerde (Participant), Jaanika Erne (Participant), Marie-Laurence Hébert-Dolbec (Participant)

Activity: Participating in or organising an eventParticipation in workshop, seminar

Description

In the 1840s, Europeans often expressed a deep mistrust of the international order that had been created in Europe after the Napoleonic Wars. This feeling resulted from the assertive and often illegal policies of the great powers which made a considerable number of people believe that the world was dominated by the strength of material power instead of written law. With this conviction, the questions of security, justice and international law became more and more debated in Europe. Some contemporaries desired to change the post- Napoleonic order by replacing it with a new one based on the principle of nationhood ensuring greater justice and a more stable peace among free European nations. During the same decade a similar debate on the political-legal coexistence with European countries spread in the United States. The goal of the paper is to reveal this important, but in historical and legal scholarship still neglected, phenomenon that existed in the mid-19th century on both sides of the Atlantic and contributed to the globalisation of international order.
Period18 Oct 2022
Event typeSeminar
LocationBrussel, Belgium
Degree of RecognitionLocal