A 2-year multicentre, open-label, randomized, controlled study of growth hormone (Genotropin(®) ) treatment in very young children born small for gestational age: Early Growth and Neurodevelopment (EGN) Study

Jean De Schepper, Johan Vanderfaeillie, Primus-E Mullis, Raoul Rooman, Anna Robertson, Maria Dilleen, Roy Gomez, Hartmut A Wollmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: In Europe, growth hormone (GH) treatment for children born small for gestational age (SGA) can only be initiated after 4 years of age. However, younger age at treatment initiation is a predictor of favourable response. To assess the effect of GH treatment on early growth and cognitive functioning in very young (<30 months), short-stature children born SGA.

DESIGN: A 2-year, randomized controlled, multicentre study (NCT00627523; EGN study), in which patients received either GH treatment or no treatment for 24 months.

PATIENTS: Children aged 19-29 months diagnosed as SGA at birth, and for whom sufficient early growth data were available, were eligible. Patients were randomized (1:1) to GH treatment (Genotropin(®) , Pfizer Inc.) at a dose of 0·035 mg/kg/day by subcutaneous injection, or no treatment.

MEASUREMENTS: The primary objective was to assess the change from baseline in height standard deviation score (SDS) after 24 months of GH treatment.

RESULTS: Change from baseline in height SDS was significantly greater in the GH treatment vs control group at both month 12 (1·03 vs 0·14) and month 24 (1·63 vs 0·43; both P < 0·001). Growth velocity SDS was significantly higher in the GH treatment vs control group at 12 months (P < 0·001), but not at 24 months. There was no significant difference in mental or psychomotor development indices between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS: GH treatment for 24 months in very young short-stature children born SGA resulted in a significant increase in height SDS compared with no treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-360
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A 2-year multicentre, open-label, randomized, controlled study of growth hormone (Genotropin(®) ) treatment in very young children born small for gestational age: Early Growth and Neurodevelopment (EGN) Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this