A novel multidisciplinary approach toward a better understanding of cranial suture closure: The first evidence of genetic effects in adulthood

Katalin Wolff, E. Hadadi, Z. Vas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to perform new, relevant information about cranial suture closure in adults. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in targeted genes were examined, which encode factors that play an important role in cranial suture development and maintenance. Our hypothesis was that some of these genes and polymorphisms can influence the cranial suture obliteration status in adulthood as well. Methods: Ossification of cranial sutures was ascertained according to Meindl and Lovejoy's vault system (1985: Am J Phys Anthropol 68(1):57-66), and peripheral blood samples were collected during autopsy procedure of 106 individuals at the Department of Forensic and Insurance Medicine, Semmelweis University, Hungary. Genotyping of SNPs was conducted using competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction KASPar chemistry. Multivariate linear models were used to test whether SNP polymorphism of the investigated genes has a significant effect on the ectocranial suture synostosis in adults. Results: The msh homeobox 1 (MSX1): rs3821947 polymorphism showed significant association with the extent of suture obliteration. Conclusions: Cranial suture closure in adults is a complex, multifactorial process. According to previous results MSX1 has a role in calvarial bone development and it has an effect on sutural mesenchyme in latter postnatal stages. Our results demonstrate MSX1 effects on suture obliteration in adulthood. These findings represent new, relevant information indicating that genetic background can have an impact on cranial suture closure in adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)835-843
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

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