Abkhazia, Transnistria and North Cyprus: Recognition and Non-Recognition in Ceasefire and Trade Agreements: A

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Abstract

Contested states and states countering secession may have to recognize each other when negotiating ceasefire and trade agreements, including trade regulations. Although these kinds of formalized relations do not imply the recognition of statehood, they strengthen or weaken status claims and the identities of the parties involved. Hence, such processes of mutual recognition do not suspend political contestation. As well as recognition policies, conflicting parties also have non-recognition policies in which they defend a position on the kind of status and identity they do not want to be associated with or that they do not want to be attributed to the other party. This article compares the policies of recognition and non-recognition of status and identity in negotiations for ceasefire and trade agreements involving the contested states of Abkhazia, Transnistria and North Cyprus. This chapter has previously been published in The Ideology and Politics Journal, 12, 1 (2019).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPost-Soviet Secessionism
Subtitle of host publicationNation-Building and State-Failure after Communism
EditorsMikhail Minakov, Gwendolyn Sasse, Daria Isachenko
Place of PublicationStuttgart
Publisheribidem
Pages15-57
Number of pages43
Volume226
ISBN (Print)978-3-8382-1538-9
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Publication series

NameSoviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society
Publisheribidem
Volume226
ISSN (Print)1614-3515

Keywords

  • secession
  • recognition
  • Abkhazia
  • North Cyprus
  • Transnistria

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