Capturing the practice of deconstruction in Brussels (1903-1939): Photographic heritage collections as a starting point for construction history

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Abstract

This paper uses the photographic collection created by the heritage organisation ‘Comité d’Etudes du Vieux Bruxelles’ to study deconstruction practices in Brussels between 1903 and 1939. An analysis of images just before, during and after buildings were taken down, allows insights into the demolition techniques that were used and the economic and heritage value of the materials that were dismantled. By doing so, the paper contributes to the research on the reuse of building materials in Brussels, while also illustrating the value of photographic reportages that documented buildings at the end of their lives.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTimber and Construction
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the Ninth Conference of the Construction History Society
EditorsJames WP Campbell, Nina Baker, Michael Driver, Michael Heaton, Natcha Ruamsanitwong, Christine Wall, David Yeomans
Place of PublicationCambridge
PublisherConstruction History Society
Pages387-396
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)978-0-9928751-8-3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2022
EventNinth Annual Conference of the Construction History Society - Queens' College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Apr 20223 Apr 2022

Conference

ConferenceNinth Annual Conference of the Construction History Society
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityCambridge
Period1/04/223/04/22

Keywords

  • Construction history
  • Salvage
  • Reuse
  • 20th century
  • demolition
  • deconstruction
  • BRUSSELS

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