Determining On-/Off-track Lesions in Glenohumeral Dislocation Using Multiplanar Reconstruction Computed Tomography Is Easier and More Reproducible Than Using 3-dimensional Computed Tomography

Laura Irène C Mulleneers, Hannah Van Rompaey, Baïdir Haloui, Nicole Pouliart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The glenoid track is a useful tool to predict engagement and therefore the risk of recurrence of dislocation in the presence of Hill-Sachs and/or bony Bankart lesions. To assess the glenoid track preoperatively, only methods using 3-dimensional reconstruction (3DR) have been described, but these lack a standardized, reliable, and easy description.

PURPOSE/HYPOTHESIS: To evaluate a new method for determining the glenoid track using computed tomography (CT) scan with multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) in comparison with using 3DR images. Our hypothesis was that the MPR method would be easier to standardize and more reproducible.

STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2.

METHODS: A total of 52 patients whose arthro-CT scan revealed a Hill-Sachs lesion, whether in combination with a bony Bankart lesion or not, were included. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data from the 52 CT scans were all analyzed using open source image analysis software. Glenoid width, with or without associated bony defect, and the Hill-Sachs interval (HSI) were measured on MPR as well as on 3DR images. All measurements obtained using both methods were directly compared and evaluated for intra- and interobserver reliability.

RESULTS: In absolute values, only small differences were seen between the MPR and 3DR methods, amounting to a maximal difference of 0.07 cm for the HSI and 0.04 cm for the glenoid width. For glenoid measurements, both methods were similar. For humeral measurements, the MPR method demonstrated higher inter- and intraobserver reliability than did the 3DR method.

CONCLUSION: The newly described MPR method for the assessment of the glenoid track and HSI is at least as accurate as the published 3DR method, with better intra- and interobserver reliability. Because MPRs are also easier to obtain, this method could be recommended in daily practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-145
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume49
Issue number1
Early online date3 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • bipolar bone loss
  • computed tomography
  • glenoid track
  • imaging
  • instability
  • shoulder

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Determining On-/Off-track Lesions in Glenohumeral Dislocation Using Multiplanar Reconstruction Computed Tomography Is Easier and More Reproducible Than Using 3-dimensional Computed Tomography'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this