Evolution of electroencephalogram in infants with tuberous sclerosis complex and neurodevelopmental outcome: a prospective cohort study

EPISTOP Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIM: To describe the evolution of electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics in infants with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and the relationship with neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months.

METHOD: Eighty-three infants were enrolled in the EPISTOP trial and underwent serial EEG follow-up until the age of 24 months (males n=45, females n=37, median age at enrolment 28d, interquartile range 14-54d). Maturation of the EEG background and epileptiform discharges were compared between the TSC1 and TSC2 variants and between preventive and conventional groups respectively.

RESULTS: Children with TSC2 more frequently had a slower posterior dominant rhythm (PDR) at 24 months (51% vs 11%, p=0.002), a higher number of epileptiform foci (median=8 vs 4, p=0.003), and a lower fraction of EEGs without epileptiform discharges (18% vs 61%, p=0.001) at follow-up. A slower PDR at 24 months was significantly associated with lower cognitive (median=70 vs 80, p=0.028) and motor developmental quotients (median=70 vs 79, p=0.008). A higher fraction of EEGs without epileptiform discharges was associated with a lower probability of autism spectrum disorder symptoms (odds ratio=0.092, 95% confidence interval=0.009-0.912, p=0.042) and higher cognitive (p=0.004), language (p=0.002), and motor (p=0.001) developmental quotients at 24 months.

INTERPRETATION: TSC2 is associated with more abnormal EEG characteristics compared to TSC1, which are predictive for neurodevelopmental outcome.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Early online date2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

© 2021 Mac Keith Press.

Keywords

  • electroencephalogram
  • infants
  • tuberous sclerosis complex
  • neurodevelopmental outcome

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