Eye movements and stress during eye-tracking gaming performance in children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy

Saranda Bekteshi, Petra Karlsson, Lieselot De Reyck, Karen Vermeerbergen, Marco Konings, Patrick Hellin, Jean-Marie Aerts, Hans Hallez, Bernard Dan, Elegast Monbaliu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM: This study aimed to explore eye movements and stress during eye-tracking gaming performance in children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP) compared with typically developing children, and associations between eye-tracking performance, eye movements, stress, and participants' characteristics.

METHOD: This cohort study included 12 children with dyskinetic CP aged 5 to 12 years (mean age 8 years 7 months, standard deviation [SD] 2 years 3 months) and 23 typically developing children aged 5 to 13 years (mean age 9 years 0 months, SD 2 years 7 months). Participants played 10 eye-tracking games. Tobii X3-120 and Tobii Pro Lab were used to record and analyse eye movements. Stress was assessed through heart rate variability (HRV), recorded during rest, and eye-tracking performance using the Bittium Faros360° ECG Holter device. Eye-tracking performance was measured using gaming completion time. Fixation and saccade variables were used to quantify eye movements, and time- and frequency-domain variables to quantify HRV. Non-parametric statistics were used.

RESULTS: Gaming completion time was significantly different (p < 0.001) between groups, and it was negatively correlated with experience (rs = -0.63, p = 0.029). No significant differences were found between groups in fixation and saccade variables. HRV significantly changed from rest to eye-tracking performance only in typically developing children and not in children with dyskinetic CP.

INTERPRETATION: Children with dyskinetic CP took longer to perform the 10 games, especially the inexperienced users, indicating the importance of the early provision of eye-tracking training opportunities. It seems that eye-tracking tasks are not a source of increased stress and effort in children with dyskinetic CP.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

© 2022 Mac Keith Press.

Keywords

  • children
  • neurology
  • eye movement
  • stress
  • eye-tracking gaming
  • dyskinetic cerebral palsy

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