Gender and designations for persons in German, Dutch and English: Does grammatical variation lead to intercultural differences?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterSpecialist

Abstract

Questionnaires in the 3 languages have been filled in by students of Universities in Amsterdam, Brussels, Freiburg, Oxford and Wuppertal about their use of designations for men and women, both nouns and pronouns, and about their attitude to non-sexist use of language. German-speaking students, whose native language has precise and (due to the grammar) complicated rules for non-sexist use of language do not seem to like using such a language more than the speakers of the other languages, even rather less. The conclusion of the research is, that intercultural differences due to the grammar could not be found.
Original languageGerman
Title of host publicationSprachvariation und Sprachreflexion in interkulturellen Kontexten
EditorsCorinna Peschel, Kerstin Runschke
Place of PublicationFrankfurt am Main
PublisherP. Lang, Frankfurt/M. etc.
Pages63-85
Number of pages23
Volume16
ISBN (Print)978-3-631-65273-2
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Publication series

NameSprache – Kommunikation – Kultur. Soziolinguistische Beiträg
PublisherPeter Lang
Volume16

Keywords

  • Gender (nouns and pronouns)
  • non-sexist use of language
  • attitudes of students

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