Hot-water immersion does not increase postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates during recovery from resistance-type exercise in healthy, young males

Cas J Fuchs, Joey S J Smeets, Joan M Senden, Antoine H Zorenc, Joy P B Goessens, Wouter D van Marken Lichtenbelt, Lex B Verdijk, Luc J C van Loon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of postexercise hot-water immersion on postprandial myofibrillar protein synthesis rates during recovery from a single bout of resistance-type exercise in healthy, young men. Twelve healthy, adult men (age: 23 ± 1 y) performed a single bout of resistance-type exercise followed by 20 min of water immersion of both legs. One leg was immersed in hot water [46°C: hot-water immersion (HWI)], while the other leg was immersed in thermoneutral water (30°C: CON). After water immersion, a beverage was ingested containing 20 g intrinsically L-[1-13C]-phenylalanine and L-[1-13C]-leucine labeled milk protein with 45 g of carbohydrates. In addition, primed continuous L-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine and L-[1-13C]-leucine infusions were applied, with frequent collection of blood and muscle samples to assess myofibrillar protein synthesis rates in vivo over a 5-h recovery period. Muscle temperature immediately after water immersion was higher in the HWI compared with the CON leg (37.5 ± 0.1 vs. 35.2 ± 0.2°C; P < 0.001). Incorporation of dietary protein-derived L-[1-13C]-phenylalanine into myofibrillar protein did not differ between the HWI and CON leg during the 5-h recovery period (0.025 ± 0.003 vs. 0.024 ± 0.002 MPE; P = 0.953). Postexercise myofibrillar protein synthesis rates did not differ between the HWI and CON leg based upon L-[1-13C]-leucine (0.050 ± 0.005 vs. 0.049 ± 0.002%/h; P = 0.815) and L-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine (0.048 ± 0.002 vs. 0.047 ± 0.003%/h; P = 0.877), respectively. Hot-water immersion during recovery from resistance-type exercise does not increase the postprandial rise in myofibrillar protein synthesis rates. In addition, postexercise hot-water immersion does not increase the capacity of the muscle to incorporate dietary protein-derived amino acids in muscle tissue protein during subsequent recovery.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to assess the effect of postexercise hot-water immersion on postprandial myofibrillar protein synthesis rates and the incorporation of dietary protein-derived amino acids into muscle protein. We observed that hot-water immersion during recovery from a single bout of resistance-type exercise does not further increase myofibrillar protein synthesis rates or augment the postprandial incorporation of dietary protein-derived amino acids in muscle throughout 5 h of postexercise recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1012-1022
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985)
Volume128
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2020

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