How customers motive attributions impact intentions to use an interactive kiosk in-store

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores the effect of customers motive attributions that is, the motives customers ascribe to a retailer for introducing interactive kiosks into the store, on their expectations of the technology and usage intentions. We study two types of motive attribution: (1) to self-serve the retailer's own economic goals or (2) to better serve customers' needs. Data were collected at a do-it-yourself retailer that recently installed interactive kiosks. Empirical results demonstrate that customer-serving motive attributions improve intention to use, both via expected performance and via expected enjoyment. Our findings also demonstrate that customers expect the interactive kiosk to be less enjoyable when attributing self-serving retailer motives. Managerial implications are discussed along with direction for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102918
JournalJournal of Retailing and Consumer Services
Volume66
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2022

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