Imbalance of Ecosystem Services of Wetlands and the Perception of the Local Community towards their Restoration and Management in Jimma Highlands, Southwestern Ethiopia

Admasu Moges, Beyene HAILU Abebe, Ludwig Triest, Argaw Ambelu, Ensermu Kelbessa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wetlands provide vital services for the livelihoods of local peoples; however, the ecological integrity of wetlands in Ethiopia has not yet been studied. In this study, we investigated the main ecosystem services of wetlands among different land use types, incorporating local perception toward wetland management. Six wetlands were selected from forested, agricultural and urban areas in the Jimma highlands. A total of 332 local residents within a 5-km radius of each wetland were surveyed. An additional 34 development agents and district and zonal experts were interviewed. The provisioning and cultural services were found to surpass the regulatory and supporting services of wetlands in agricultural and urban land uses compared with wetlands located in the forest. Although most individuals positively viewed wetland regulation and supporting services, the majority of households (66 %) were not interested in conserving wetlands because of small landholdings and the need to meet their livelihoods. Consequently, the vital regulatory and supporting services of impacted agricultural and urban wetlands are gradually becoming limited. Urgent action is, therefore, required to restore and protect these wetlands by promoting alternative livelihoods and improving the agricultural productivity of small landholders.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1081-1095
Number of pages15
JournalWetlands
Volume38
Issue number6
Early online date2 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Ecosystem services
  • Ethiopia
  • Local people’s perception
  • Wetlands

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