Improving clarity and transparency in cognitive assessment: conversion of the Cambridge Cognition Examination to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

Sam Kirch, Ellen Gorus, Charlotte Brys, Elise Cornelis, Patricia De Vriendt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: A variety of screening, diagnostic and assessment tools have been developed for use in dementia research and care. However, there is no consensus which tool to use and moreover there is no transparency in communication between countries and disciplines. Objective: To contribute to a more uniform assessment in dementia, the Cambridge Cognition Examination (CAMCOG) was converted to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods: In a qualitative design, CAMCOG-items and –scoring-system were converted to the ICF addressing 3 ICF domains: global and specific mental functions and general tasks and demands. Construct and discriminative validity was checked in a sample of 25 cognitively healthy elderly (CHE), 25 persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and 25 patients with mild Alzheimer’s Disease (mAD). Results: A significant correlation was observed between CAMCOG/ICF-CAMCOG (r = − 0.987; p < 0.01). The areas under the curve (AUC) of the ICF-CAMCOG were between 0.819 and 0.978; comparable with the original CAMCOG. Only a significant difference between the AUC of the CHE versus MCI (0.911 vs. 0.819; p = 0.0094) was observed in favour of CAMCOG. Conclusion: The clinical use of the ICF-CAMCOG looks promising offering a more detailed and interpretable scoring and may allow for better planning of resources to aid patients with dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-466
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Geriatric Medicine
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's Dementia
  • Clinimetrics
  • Mild cognitive impairment

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