Is synovia a determinant of biomechanical effects of manual therapy?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingMeeting abstract (Book)

Abstract

Systema?c reviews have consistently concluded that the inter-examiner reliability of passive assessment of mo?on in joints of the spine, the pelvis, and the extremi?es is unacceptably low.1-8 In addi?on, the methodological quality of the studies included in these reviews was generally poor. Reliability, as a component of reproducibility, reflects the extent to which repeated measurements provide similar results in stable study subjects.9 Therefore, reviewers have aCempted to assess the risk of bias in studies of inter-examiner reliability of passive joint mo?on assessment by determining whether the characteris?c under study, i.e., the joint’s mobility, remained stable during the research. Instability of a joint’s mobility can occur as a result of natural varia?on over ?me or as an effect of the assessment procedure itself poten?ally resul?ng in underes?mated outcomes of reliability. However, empirical evidence for this type of bias is lacking making reviewers’ judgments difficult. Mechanical effects of passive joint interven?ons such as s?ffness changes could be expected to occur rela?vely immediately.10 However, biomechanical mechanisms of manual therapy have only scarcely been inves?gated and the current evidence for the explana?on of effects from passive movementbased interven?ons seems to be in favour of neurophysiological mechanisms.11,12 We hypothesised that poten?al changes in biomechanical proper?es of joints aQer passive movements are due to immediate changes in intra-ar?cular joint pressure and, consequently, in volume or distribu?on of synovial fluid. We used ultrasonography (US) and magne?c resonance imaging (MRI) for visualising and measuring in vivo ?me-dependent changes in synovial fluid volume in joints of the upper cervical spine, the knee joints, and the metacarpophalangeal joints of three healthy human subjects aQer passive joint mo?on assessment, mobilisa?on, and thrust manipula?on. This presenta?on shows the results of these preliminary basic science experiments. Addi?onally, the limita?ons of the study as well as future direc?ves are discussed. The presenta?on concludes by discussing with the audience whether synovia can be a determinant of the poten?al biomechanical effects of manual therapy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAbstract book of the combined 10th annual academy science board conference and 7th bi-annual academy conference of the international Academy of Manual/Musculoskeletal Medicine
Pages23-23
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventCombined 10th Annual Academy Science Board Conference and 7th bi-annual Academy Conference of the International Academy of Manual/Musculoskeletal Medicine, Brussels, Belgium, 6-7 November 2015 - Brussels, Belgium
Duration: 6 Nov 20157 Nov 2015

Conference

ConferenceCombined 10th Annual Academy Science Board Conference and 7th bi-annual Academy Conference of the International Academy of Manual/Musculoskeletal Medicine, Brussels, Belgium, 6-7 November 2015
CountryBelgium
CityBrussels
Period6/11/157/11/15

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