Lemon juice and apple juice used as source of citrate and malate, respectively, enhance the formation of buttery aroma compounds and/or organic acids during Type 2 and Type 3 sourdough productions performed with Companilactobacillus crustorum LMG 23699

Andrea Comasio, Simon Van Kerrebroeck, Luc De Vuyst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extra ingredients are often used in traditional sourdough production recipes by artisan bakeries. These ingredients may be the source of microorganisms or stimulate the growth and/or the metabolic activities of the microorganisms added to or naturally present in the flour-water mixture. The present study examined the influence of the addition of lemon juice or apple juice as source of citrate or malate, respectively, on the growth and activity of the citrate- and malate-positive Companilactobacillus crustorum LMG 23699 strain (formerly known as Lactobacillus crustorum LMG 23699), used to initiate firm (dough yield of 200) wheat sourdough productions, and on the flavour of the baked goods produced. Three fermentation strategies were applied, namely one-step long fermentation sourdough production processes with the addition of juice at the start (Type 2) and backslopped fermentations with the addition of juice either only at the start of the sourdough productions or at the start of the sourdough productions and at the beginning of each subsequent refreshment step during the whole backslopping process (both Type 3). It turned out that the starter culture strain used prevailed during all sourdough productions performed. Yeasts were particularly present in Type 3 sourdough productions, although lemon juice retarded their growth. Due to high yeast activity, high concentrations of ethanol and glycerol were produced toward the end of the sourdough productions. Addition of lemon juice stimulated the production of lactic acid, acetic acid, and the buttery flavour compounds acetoin and diacetyl, because of citrate conversion, during the Type 2 and Type 3 sourdough productions. In Type 3 sourdough productions, these compounds were found in higher concentrations only when lemon juice was added at each backslopping step. Alternatively, the addition of apple juice led to high concentrations of lactic acid because of malolactic fermentation in both Type 2 and Type 3 sourdough productions. Moreover, the addition of apple juice increased the initial concentrations of the carbohydrates (fructose, glucose, and sucrose) and sugar alcohols (mannitol and sorbitol), which were exhausted upon backslopping or accumulated in the sourdough matrix, respectively. Baked goods produced using sourdoughs obtained from the Type 2 and Type 3 sourdough productions with the addition of juice at each backslopping step were significantly different in flavour from doughs supplemented with the respective juices and lactic acid and/or Type 3 sourdough productions with the addition of juice only at the start.
Original languageEnglish
Article number109020
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume339
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Sourdough
  • Starter cultures
  • Lactic acid bacteria
  • Yeasts
  • Ingredients
  • Lactic acid
  • Ethanol
  • Diacetyl

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