Refuge(e) into Fiction: The Case of Caryl Phillips’s A Distant Shore

Research output: Unpublished contribution to conferenceUnpublished abstract

Abstract

Travellers and migrants have featured prominently in British fiction since the birth of the novel three centuries ago. At the turn of the millennium this literary interest has also extended to the asylum seeker. Having dealt with the immigrant experience in previous novels, Caryl Phillips in A Distant Shore (2003) turns his attention to the precarious situation of the (male) asylum seeker in Britain. This paper explores how Phillips's fascinating novel contributes to the ongoing public debate on the refugee issue as well as to postcolonial theorising.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2008
Event6th Conference of the Society for Multi-Ethnic Studies: Europe and the Americas (MESEA): “Migration Matters: Immigration, Homelands, and Border Crossings in Europe And The Americas” - University of Leiden, Leiden, Netherlands
Duration: 25 Jun 200828 Jun 2008

Conference

Conference6th Conference of the Society for Multi-Ethnic Studies: Europe and the Americas (MESEA): “Migration Matters: Immigration, Homelands, and Border Crossings in Europe And The Americas”
Country/TerritoryNetherlands
CityLeiden
Period25/06/0828/06/08

Keywords

  • postcolonial theory
  • asylum seeker
  • Caryl Phillips
  • A Distant Shore

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