The Complementarity Advantage: Parties, Representativeness and Newcomers’ Access to Power

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Why have ethnic minority women, a group experiencing 'double barriers' in society and politics-gained inroads into formal politics in Belgium more quickly than ethnic minority men? Our qualitative analysis of candidate selection shows that political parties prefer ethnic minority women candidates because their 'intersectional identity mix' is maximally complementary to groups embodied by the incumbents. It enables party selectors to maximise the representativeness of the list by including a limited number of newcomers. The groups that are able to cash in on such a 'complementarity advantage' vary depending on the identity of the incumbents and the political salience of social groups' identities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-61
Number of pages19
JournalParliamentary Affairs
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

Keywords

  • Candidate selection
  • Ethnic minorities
  • Gender
  • Incumbency
  • Intersectionality
  • Representativeness

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