The consequences of parenthood and second birth rates in Europe: The puzzling case of income gains and losses

Jan Van Bavel, Caroline Dewilde

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingMeeting abstract (Book)

Abstract

People's labour market positions as well as their situation at home are usually greatly affected by the transition to parenthood. Changes at home and at work tend to be different for men and women. This paper will investigate how these changes in the aftermath of a first birth affect the transition to a second birth. Existing studies on the determinants of second birth rates tend to look only at the effect of the situation after the first birth. This paper aims to go beyond earlier work by adopting a truly sequential perspective, acknowledging that each parity progression is influenced not just by changing conditions but also by the change in conditions ("history matters"). How do the consequences of a first birth influence parents' decision to have a second child? The basic hypothesis, to be tested empirically using panel data, is that if entry into parenthood has undesirable consequences for one or both parents at home or at work, then it may be less likely that the couple goes on to have a next child.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPaper presented at the the 3rd ESF TransEurope Network Workshop: Transnationalization, Globalization and Its Effects on Women's Employment and Family Transitions
Publication statusPublished - 4 Sep 2009
EventTRANSEUROPE: Transnationalization, Globalization and their Effects on Women's Employment and Family Transitions - Tallinn, Estonia
Duration: 4 Sep 20095 Sep 2009

Workshop

WorkshopTRANSEUROPE: Transnationalization, Globalization and their Effects on Women's Employment and Family Transitions
CountryEstonia
CityTallinn
Period4/09/095/09/09

Keywords

  • fertility
  • income
  • Europe

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