The European Parliament’s communication policy: using "new" information and communication technologies to open up to citizens or staying with established interests?

Jamal Shahin, Christine Neuhold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The European Parliament, as the only directly elected EU institution, portrays itself as the forum that is open not only to input by lobby groups but to that of "average" citizens. This paper probes into the contribution of the Internet in this quest of connecting Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) with citizens and here specifically, we examine the role of the EP's Standing Committees. The analysis is rooted within the larger debate of the possible contribution of the Internet for encouraging the development of a European public space. The discussion focuses on the use of new technologies, including interactive and non-interactive communication methods such as email and discussion fora. It attempts to generate a series of topics for further investigation by outlining some initial results from interviews, carried out at the European level.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)388-402
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Legislative Studies
Volume13
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2007

Keywords

  • European Parliament
  • e-democracy
  • Standing Committees
  • email
  • Internet use

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