The influence of a “de minimis” clause on the CO2 emissions of developing countries’ flights to or from the European Union – A Belgian case-study

Julien Matheys, Jean-Marc Timmermans, Nele Sergeant, Heijke Rombaut, Faycal-Siddikou Boureima, Joeri Van Mierlo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Abstract

Statement of objectives

In the context of the inclusion of aviation in the European Emission Trading Scheme (EU-ETS), the European authorities are evaluating the possibility to include a 'de minimis' clause to the newly proposed directive (amending Directive 2003/87/EC so as to include aviation activities in the scheme for greenhouse gas emission allowance trading). This clause states that operators performing less than a defined yearly number of flights (typically less than one flight per day) to or from the European Union would be exempted from participation to the EU-ETS. This paper provides an overview of an evaluation of the effect of these possible exemptions on total CO2 emissions for flights between developing countries and the European Union. A case study is presented for flights between Belgian airports and airports located in Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

Method of approach

The calculation method is based on the approach used in the Belgian Federal Research project ABC Impacts: 'Aviation and the Belgian Climate Policy: Integration options and Impacts'. The calculations are based on data provided by the Belgian Air Traffic Management operator (Belgocontrol) and include all activities taking place in the Belgian air space. On the basis of these data several kinds of flights will be excluded from the analysis to focus exclusively on developing countries. The excluded flights are: flights to/from industrialized countries, flights operated by the main operators performing scheduled flights (which easily overpass the threshold value for an exemption to participate in the EU-ETS), and flights to or from countries with a highly developed tourist activity (typically some countries in the Mediterranean region). What remains will be the flight operations to or from developing countries. Typically these flights include flights to or from 5 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) code zones: G (Western Africa), H (Eastern Africa), F (Sub-Saharian Africa), S (South America) and M (Central America and the Caribbean area). In the next step, the Corinair methodology will be applied to calculate fuel consumption and CO2 emissions related to the flights described above.


Results and conclusions

An overview of the emissions originating from the exempted flights will be provided and will be put into perspective by comparing them with the total emissions due to the flights to or from Belgian airports. Moreover the efficiency of the proposed measure will be assessed. Advantages and drawbacks of the measure are discussed to put things into a broader perspective.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEnvironment and Transport in different contexts - Ghardaïa, Algeria
Publication statusPublished - 10 Feb 2009
EventFinds and Results from the Swedish Cyprus Expedition: A Gender Perspective at the Medelhavsmuseet - Stockholm, Sweden
Duration: 21 Sep 200925 Sep 2009

Publication series

NameEnvironment and Transport in different contexts - Ghardaïa, Algeria

Conference

ConferenceFinds and Results from the Swedish Cyprus Expedition: A Gender Perspective at the Medelhavsmuseet
CountrySweden
CityStockholm
Period21/09/0925/09/09

Keywords

  • European Union Emission Trading Scheme
  • Aviation
  • 'de minimis' clause
  • CO2 emissions

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