The relation between self-perceived fatigue, body composition and handgrip performance in obese adolescents

Research output: Unpublished contribution to conferenceUnpublished paper

Abstract

Abstract
The relation between self-perceived fatigue, body composition and handgrip performance in obese adolescents .
S. Vantieghem1, S. Provyn1, J. Tresignie1, A. De Guchtenaere³, M. Van Helvoirt³ and I. Bautmans2
1 Department of Experimental Anatomy, Faculty of Physical Education and Physical Therapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel ² Department of Gerontology, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, ³ Zeepreventorium
Introduction
Maximal strength is an important factor to perform daily activities, especially in obese persons whose muscles must carry heavier loads, which can induce higher levels of fatigue. Handgrip is an easy tool to determine the maximal strength and correlates well with other isometric strength measures in adults. There is conflicting evidence whether grip strength in obese persons is different from lean ones. Several studies suggest that better grip strength is associated with lower cardiovascular disease, and positively correlated with BMI and fat free mass, but negatively with body fat percentage. Studies correlating grip strength with segmental and total body composition (estimated using DXA) in obese children are scarce. This study aims to explore the relationship between self-perceived fatigue, body composition and muscle performance in obese adolescents.

Methods

117 obese children were examined for body composition, muscle performance (maximal grip strength, fatigue resistance and grip work) and self-perceived fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, MFI-20).

Results

Girls showed significantly lower lean mass but higher %fat (arms, legs, and thorax) and bone mineral content (BMC, for the thorax) compared to the boys . Grip strength, fatigue resistance and grip work were similar in both genders (even when corrected for lean arm mass). Girls scored significant higher on MFI subscales "general fatigue" and "reduced activity". Higher grip strength was significantly related with higher lean mass and BMC, and with lower %fat, fat mass and physical fatigue. In boys higher total MFI, MFI subscale "physical fatigue" and "reduced activity" was related to lower lean arm mass and higher arm %fat. In the boys higher self-perceived fatigue was also related to higher waist-hip ratio. In the girls, higher self-perceived physical fatigue was related to lower BMC (arm, thorax and total BMC). In both boys and girls, higher self-perceived physical fatigue was related to lower grip strength. In boys, higher levels of self-perceived fatigue were related to worse muscle endurance (fatigue resistance & grip work).

Conclusion
Based on our results we can conclude that fatigue sensations are significantly related to body composition and muscle performance in obese adolescents. Further studies are necessary to evaluate whether self-perceived fatigue is affected by weight loss and/or physical exercise interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • obesity
  • body composition
  • handgrip performance
  • self-perceived fatigue
  • adolescents

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