Why is probation invisible? Applying the newsworthiness framework of Chibnall and Jewkes in a comparative study of Belgium and England and Wales

Aline Bauwens, George Mair

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingMeeting abstract (Book)Research

Abstract

There is a clear lack of media representation with regard to probation worldwide, whether this involves newspapers, television or films; the probation service, probation work and probation staff are notable by their absence - and especially when compared to the police, courts or prisons. Using, as a benchmark, Chibnall's eight 'professional imperatives which act as implicit guides to the construction of new stories' and the reappraised and reformulated imperatives of Chibnall by Jewkes, this paper examines the contemporary probation-media relationship. The findings will be discussed in a comparative perspective (Belgium versus England and Wales) and in relation to the wider context of increasing punitiveness as well as recent organisational changes.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPaper presented at the 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Prague, 10-13 September 2014
Publication statusPublished - 11 Sep 2014
Event14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Eurocrim - Prague, Czech Republic
Duration: 10 Sep 201413 Sep 2014

Conference

Conference14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Eurocrim
CountryCzech Republic
CityPrague
Period10/09/1413/09/14

Keywords

  • probation
  • media
  • newsworthiness

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