Women’s Involvement in Pedestrian-Vehicular Crashes: the Influence of Personal and Environmental Factors

Kelly J. Clifton, Carolina Burnier, Kandice Kreamer Fults

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Abstract

Pedestrian-vehicle crashes are examined for patterns by gender. The analysis focuses on how the pedestrian crashes of men and women vary by personal characteristics (age, condition, injury) and physical characteristics of the crash area (location type, density, land use, pedestrian activity). The data for this study are pedestrian-vehicle crashes in Baltimore City, Maryland, from the State of Maryland Motor Vehicle Accident Report. The results from the analysis presented here suggest that, in general, there are few significant gender effects in the majority of pedestrian crashes. Women tend to be involved in fewer pedestrian crashes overall, and when they are involved, they appear to exhibit fewer risk-taking behaviors, such as violating traffic laws and consuming alcohol or drugs. Women were slightly less likely to be injured in a crash and less likely to die as a result. The effects of land use on pedestrian crash rates were not significant by gender. However, a higher percentage of women's crashes occur in areas with high pedestrian activity, which may be reflective of the distribution of areas in which women walk.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResearch on Women's Issues in Transportation, Report of a Conference: Technical papers
PublisherTransportation Research Board
Pages155-162
ISBN (Print)9780309093941
Publication statusPublished - 2005
EventTransportation Research Board, Research on Women's Travel Issues - Chicago, United States
Duration: 18 Nov 200420 Nov 2004

Conference

ConferenceTransportation Research Board, Research on Women's Travel Issues
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period18/11/0420/11/04

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Pedestrian
  • Crashes
  • Built environment

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