African Trypanosomiasis as paradigm for involvement of the mononuclear phagocyte system in pathogenicity during parasite infection

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Samenvatting

Studies into the role of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), which include myeloid cells (i.e., macrophages, monocytes and granulocytes), during experimental murine trypanosome infections, have revealed that these cells make an important contribution to African trypanosomiasis development both during the early and later/chronic stages of infection, whereby they can play a protective or pathogenic role depending on their activation state. In this chapter, we will discuss (1) the parasite­host interactions with a focus on the role played by cells of the MPS and parasite-derived components triggering immune responses during the different stages/phases of experimental trypanosome infections and (2) the contribution of cells of the MPS to immunopathogenicity development with focus on liver injury and anemia. Finally, we will give (3) an overview of different strategies that can be employed to alleviate immunopathogenicity which might pave the way to develop new intervention strategies, as well as (4) discuss the potential link between murine models and HAT.
Originele taal-2English
TitelMacrophages: biology and role in the pathology of diseases
RedacteurenS.k. Biswas, A. Mantovani
UitgeverijSpringer
Pagina's349-374
Aantal pagina's26
ISBN van elektronische versie978-1-4939-1311-4
ISBN van geprinte versie978-1-4939-1310-7
StatusPublished - 1 jan 2014

Bibliografische nota

S.K. Biswas, A. Mantovani

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