Neglected plant parasites: Mitrastemonaceae

Luiza Teixeira-Costa, Kenji Suetsugu

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Samenvatting

Mitrastemonaceae are a remarkable family of parasitic flowering plants. The two species that make up this family have a disjunct distribution and a peculiar appearance. Both are devoid of roots, stems, and regular leaves and live inside the roots of their host plants for most of their life cycle. Their white-pink flowers and berry-like fruits become visible on the forest floor only during their reproductive phase. This cryptic growth form, allied to their patchy distribution, and the muted color of their flowers have contributed to making Mitrastemonaceae one of the least collected and analyzed families of parasitic plants. On the other hand, recent findings regarding the phylogenetic position of the family have advanced our understanding of the family's biogeography and prompted a reexamination of their ecology and evolution. Here we review key aspects of the life cycle, reproductive ecology, and host relationships in the family Mitrastemonaceae to identify gaps in our current knowledge and instigate future research.
Originele taal-2English
Pagina's (van-tot)5-13
Aantal pagina's9
TijdschriftPlants People Planet
Volume5
Nummer van het tijdschrift1
DOI's
StatusPublished - jan 2023

Bibliografische nota

Funding Information:
Herbarium specimens used for the analysis of host specificity in Mitrastemon yamamotoi were provided by the Botanical Survey of India, Eastern Regional Centre (ASSAM 38224, 38225) and the Naturalis Biodiversity Center (L 1666884). The authors are grateful to the curators and staff members at these institutions, as well as to Anthony Brach and Michaela Schmull (Harvard University Herbaria), for their valuable support. LTC acknowledges Alexander Vázquez, Daniel Gómez, Fernando Vázquez, Juan Martínez, Juvenal Hernández, and Martín Castillo who greatly helped collecting Mitrastemon matudae at the Reserva Biológica La Sepultura, in Mexico. Figure 1c is under a Creative Commons license type Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International (creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). LTC was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the Harvard University Herbaria, and a junior fellowship from the Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg - Institute for Advanced Studies. KS is supported by PRESTO from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) (JPMJPR21D6).

Funding Information:
Herbarium specimens used for the analysis of host specificity in were provided by the Botanical Survey of India, Eastern Regional Centre (ASSAM 38224, 38225) and the Naturalis Biodiversity Center (L 1666884). The authors are grateful to the curators and staff members at these institutions, as well as to Anthony Brach and Michaela Schmull (Harvard University Herbaria), for their valuable support. LTC acknowledges Alexander Vázquez, Daniel Gómez, Fernando Vázquez, Juan Martínez, Juvenal Hernández, and Martín Castillo who greatly helped collecting at the Reserva Biológica La Sepultura, in Mexico. Figure 1c is under a Creative Commons license type Attribution Non‐Commercial 4.0 International ( creativecommons.org/licenses/by‐nc/4.0 /). LTC was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the Harvard University Herbaria, and a junior fellowship from the Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg ‐ Institute for Advanced Studies. KS is supported by PRESTO from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) (JPMJPR21D6). Mitrastemon yamamotoi Mitrastemon matudae

Copyright:
Copyright 2022 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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