Regional and global perspectives of honey as a record of lead in the environment

Kate E. Smith, Dominique Weis, Sean R. Scott, Carl J. Berg, Yaffa Segal, Philippe Claeys

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9 Citaten (Scopus)
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Samenvatting

Honey from Apis mellifera is a useful and inexpensive biomonitor for mapping metal distributions in urban centers. The sampling resolution of a biomonitoring survey (e.g., city versus global scale) determines which geochemical processes are reflected in the results. This study presents Pb isotopic compositions and metal concentrations in honey from around the world, sampled at varying resolutions: honey from Canada (n = 21), the United States (n = 111), Belgium (n = 25), and New Zealand (n = 10), with additional samples from Afghanistan, Brazil, Cuba, Germany, Liberia, Taiwan, and Turkey. Honey was sampled at high resolution in two uniquely different land-use settings (New York Metro Area and the Hawaiian island of Kauaʻi), at regional-scale resolution in eastern North America (including the Great Lakes region), and Pb isotopic compositions of all samples were compared on a global scale. At high sampling resolution, metal concentrations in honey reveal spatially significant concentration gradients: in New York City, metals associated with human activity and city infrastructure (e.g., Pb, Sb, Ti, V) are more concentrated in honey collected within the city compared to honey from upstate New York, and metal concentrations in honey from Kauaʻi suggest polluting effects of nearby agricultural operations. At lower resolution (regional and global scales), lead isotopic compositions of honey are more useful than metal concentrations in revealing large-scale Pb processes (e.g., the enduring legacy of global leaded gasoline use throughout the twentieth century) and the continental origin of the honey. Lead isotopic compositions of honey collected from N. America (especially from the eastern USA) are more radiogenic (206Pb/207Pb: 1.132–1.253, 208Pb/206Pb: 2.001–2.129) compared to European honey, and honey from New Zealand, which has the least radiogenic isotopic compositions measured in this study (206Pb/207Pb: 1.077–1.160, 208Pb/206Pb: 2.090–2.187). Thus, biomonitoring using honey at different resolutions reflects differing processes and, to some extent, a honey terroir defined by the Pb isotopic composition. The data presented here provide important (and current) global context for future studies that utilize Pb isotopes in honey. Moreover, this study exhibits community science in action, as most of the honey was collected by collaborators around the world, working directly with local apiarists and hobby beekeepers.
Originele taal-2English
Artikelnummer110800
TijdschriftEnvironmental Research
Volume195
DOI's
StatusPublished - apr 2021

Bibliografische nota

Funding Information:
Funding for this project was provided by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada ( NSERC ) Discovery Grant and by the Multidisciplinary Applied Geochemistry Network ( NSERC ), both awarded to D. Weis. The UBC Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation provided funding for networking and outreach to community scientists via the BeeHIVE Research Excellence Cluster. Additional support for K. Smith was provided by UBC via an International Doctoral Fellowship. The authors would like to thank the many scientists and community members around the world that contributed honey for this study: R. Bell, K. Bubbs, E. Ciscato, D. Engstrom, E. Frères, F. Gold, D. Hanano, L. Lavkulich, N. Moerhuis, J. Scoates, S. B. Sherman, A. Smith, M. Wollast. Special thanks to scientists M. Amini, V. Lai, K. Gordon, and T. Ockerman at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (UBC) and N. Slater at the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, Trace Element Clean Laboratory. Finally, the authors thank N. Williamson and A. Chang for initial manuscript editing and feedback and two anonymous reviewers who provided constructive edits and suggestions that helped to improve the manuscript.

Funding Information:
Funding for this project was provided by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada ( NSERC ) Discovery Grant and by the Multidisciplinary Applied Geochemistry Network ( NSERC ), both awarded to D. Weis. The UBC Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation provided funding for networking and outreach to community scientists via the BeeHIVE Research Excellence Cluster. Additional support for K. Smith was provided by UBC via an International Doctoral Fellowship.

Funding Information:
Funding for this project was provided by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Discovery Grant and by the Multidisciplinary Applied Geochemistry Network (NSERC), both awarded to D. Weis. The UBC Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation provided funding for networking and outreach to community scientists via the BeeHIVE Research Excellence Cluster. Additional support for K. Smith was provided by UBC via an International Doctoral Fellowship.Funding for this project was provided by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Discovery Grant and by the Multidisciplinary Applied Geochemistry Network (NSERC), both awarded to D. Weis. The UBC Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation provided funding for networking and outreach to community scientists via the BeeHIVE Research Excellence Cluster. Additional support for K. Smith was provided by UBC via an International Doctoral Fellowship. The authors would like to thank the many scientists and community members around the world that contributed honey for this study: R. Bell, K. Bubbs, E. Ciscato, D. Engstrom, E. Fr?res, F. Gold, D. Hanano, L. Lavkulich, N. Moerhuis, J. Scoates, S. B. Sherman, A. Smith, M. Wollast. Special thanks to scientists M. Amini, V. Lai, K. Gordon, and T. Ockerman at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (UBC) and N. Slater at the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, Trace Element Clean Laboratory. Finally, the authors thank N. Williamson and A. Chang for initial manuscript editing and feedback and two anonymous reviewers who provided constructive edits and suggestions that helped to improve the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier Inc.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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