Secondary term formation or multilingual primary term formation in the EU?

Onderzoeksoutput: Unpublished paper

Samenvatting

It has been claimed that European multilingual policy amounts to little more than a myth of equality among languages. Indeed, most of the European information flow moves from an original draft in Euro-English to official translations into Euro-varieties of all the other 23 languages. Consequently translators and legal linguists are involved in "secondary term formation". They coin neologisms that are given equal status to the Euro-English (or sometimes still) Euro-French neologism within the European context.
When translating European texts, translators into e.g. (Euro-) Dutch should be aware of some principles of secondary term formation in order to achieve optimal quality. Insights from cultural terminology theory may benefit the quality of secondary term formation. English ay be the dominant language in Europe but at the same time European multilingual primary term creation is a unique phenomenon that contributes to a European framing and ultimately to the coming into existence of a European identity and culture.
Originele taal-2English
StatusPublished - 15 feb 2015
EvenementSearching for Culture International Cultural Studies Conference (SEFOC) - Olomouc, Czech Republic
Duur: 16 okt 201417 okt 2014

Conference

ConferenceSearching for Culture International Cultural Studies Conference (SEFOC)
Land/RegioCzech Republic
StadOlomouc
Periode16/10/1417/10/14

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