The cognitive-vestibular compensation hypothesis: How cognitive impairments might be the cost of coping with compensation

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Samenvatting

Previous research in vestibular cognition has clearly demonstrated a link between the vestibular system and several cognitive and emotional functions. However, the most coherent results supporting this link come from rodent models and healthy human participants artificial stimulation models. Human research with vestibular-damaged patients shows much more variability in the observed results, mostly because of the heterogeneity of vestibular loss (VL), and the interindividual differences in the natural vestibular compensation process. The link between the physiological consequences of VL (such as postural difficulties), and specific cognitive or emotional dysfunction is not clear yet. We suggest that a neuropsychological model, based on Kahneman’s Capacity Model of Attention, could contribute to the understanding of the vestibular compensation process, and partially explain the variability of results observed in vestibular-damaged patients. Several findings in the literature support the idea of a limited quantity of cognitive resources that can be allocated to cognitive tasks during the compensation stages. This basic mechanism of attentional limitations may lead to different compensation profiles in patients, with or without cognitive dysfunction, depending on the compensation stage. We suggest several objective and subjective measures to evaluate this cognitive-vestibular compensation hypothesis.

Originele taal-2English
Artikelnummer732974
Pagina's (van-tot)1-8
Aantal pagina's8
TijdschriftFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume15
DOI's
StatusPublished - 1 okt 2021

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